Architectural Humor

Tree growing out of rain gutter

We were replacing a roof on a building here in town and had gone up to do the as-built so we could figure out how to get the job done. We found this tree growing out of a rain gutter: it was so firmly attached to whatever in there that we couldn’t pull it out! I’m not sure what the builders did…

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Fossilized dragonflies

This roof was put in about 20 years ago. At the time they poured the hot roof they had a swarm of these large dragonflies for some reason. When they landed on the hot tar, they got stuck and became part of the roof. In the summer of 2013, when we went up to take stock of the roof and see what needed to be done to replace it, the owner of the building actually requested that we preserve as many of the fossils as we could for him.

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Cut wall to fit columns

This was an addition to an existing building: the columns could not be moved, so they just built right up to them and cut the paneling around the bolts even!

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Spider sculpture

What a funny little sculpture this is! It’s not that little, either: I didn’t measure it, but it probably stands about 4 feet tall. It is located at a school, so I assume the kids play on it. I wonder who made it, and why?

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Seagull nest on roof

We found this beauty while as-building the roof of a warehouse here in Anchorage: this seagull built her nest right on top of a heater vent! Pretty ingenious, actually – it kept her egg all nice and toasty warm for her so she didn’t have to do any work at all. Rather reminded me of Maisy, that bird in that Dr. Seuss book “Horton Lays an Egg”. She wasn’t too concerned about us being there, either. She just sat off in the distance, quietly watching us.

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Missing Support

I came across this interesting situation the other day: We were out as-building a canopy that is being taken down so as to construct a more permanent arctic entry. Apparently, back when they originally put it up, they decided that the support columns were in the way = so they cut them out! They kept the base where it goes into the foundation – and they kept the top, where all the beams come together – but the middle section is simply gone! Which means, of course, that all those beams are being supported by nothing but air. How does that work, exactly?

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